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Nutrients. 2015 Jan 8;7(1):390-404. doi: 10.3390/nu7010390.

Inclusion of fermented foods in food guides around the world.

Author information

1
Canadian Centre for Human Microbiome and Probiotic Research, Lawson Health Research Institute, 268 Grosvenor St., N6A 4V2, London, ON, N6A 4V2, Canada. schilto@uwo.ca.
2
Canadian Centre for Human Microbiome and Probiotic Research, Lawson Health Research Institute, 268 Grosvenor St., N6A 4V2, London, ON, N6A 4V2, Canada. jeremy.burton@lawsonresearch.com.
3
Canadian Centre for Human Microbiome and Probiotic Research, Lawson Health Research Institute, 268 Grosvenor St., N6A 4V2, London, ON, N6A 4V2, Canada. gregor@uwo.ca.

Abstract

Fermented foods have been a well-established part of the human diet for thousands of years, without much of an appreciation for, or an understanding of, their underlying microbial functionality, until recently. The use of many organisms derived from these foods, and their applications in probiotics, have further illustrated their impact on gastrointestinal wellbeing and diseases affecting other sites in the body. However, despite the many benefits of fermented foods, their recommended consumption has not been widely translated to global inclusion in food guides. Here, we present the case for such inclusion, and challenge health authorities around the world to consider advocating for the many benefits of these foods.

PMID:
25580813
PMCID:
PMC4303846
DOI:
10.3390/nu7010390
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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