Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuron. 2015 Jan 21;85(2):289-95. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.12.037. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

Microbiota controls the homeostasis of glial cells in the gut lamina propria.

Author information

1
William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University London, London EC1M 6BQ, United Kingdom; Division of Molecular Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, United Kingdom. Electronic address: p.s.kabouridis@qmul.ac.uk.
2
Division of Molecular Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, United Kingdom.
3
Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine and School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Hubrecht Institute - KNAW and University Medical Centre Utrecht, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands.
5
Division of Molecular Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, United Kingdom. Electronic address: vpachni@nimr.mrc.ac.uk.

Abstract

The intrinsic neural networks of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from dedicated neural crest progenitors that colonize the gut during embryogenesis and give rise to enteric neurons and glia. Here, we study how an essential subpopulation of enteric glial cells (EGCs) residing within the intestinal mucosa is integrated into the dynamic microenvironment of the alimentary tract. We find that under normal conditions colonization of the lamina propria by glial cells commences during early postnatal stages but reaches steady-state levels after weaning. By employing genetic lineage tracing, we provide evidence that in adult mice the network of mucosal EGCs is continuously renewed by incoming glial cells originating in the plexi of the gut wall. Finally, we demonstrate that both the initial colonization and homeostasis of glial cells in the intestinal mucosa are regulated by the indigenous gut microbiota.

PMID:
25578362
PMCID:
PMC4306542
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.12.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center