Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2297-307. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60539-0. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

Rubella.

Author information

1
Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
2
Department of Immunization, Vaccines, and Biologicals, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
4
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
5
Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Program in Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: poland.gregory@mayo.edu.

Abstract

Rubella remains an important pathogen worldwide, with roughly 100,000 cases of congenital rubella syndrome estimated to occur every year. Rubella-containing vaccine is highly effective and safe and, as a result, endemic rubella transmission has been interrupted in the Americas since 2009. Incomplete rubella vaccination programmes result in continued disease transmission, as evidenced by recent large outbreaks in Japan and elsewhere. In this Seminar, we provide present results regarding rubella control, elimination, and eradication policies, and a brief review of new laboratory diagnostics. Additionally, we provide novel information about rubella-containing vaccine immunogenetics and review the emerging evidence of interindividual variability in humoral and cell-mediated innate and adaptive immune responses to rubella-containing vaccine and their association with haplotypes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the human genome.

PMID:
25576992
PMCID:
PMC4514442
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60539-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center