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Support Care Cancer. 2015 Apr;23(4):1137-43. doi: 10.1007/s00520-014-2597-1. Epub 2015 Jan 10.

Phase III placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of pegfilgrastim to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Japan, y-kosaka@med.kitasato-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Pegfilgrastim is a pegylated form of filgrastim, a recombinant protein of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, that is used to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). Here, we report the results of a phase III trial of pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) chemotherapy.

METHODS:

We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to determine the efficacy of pegfilgrastim in reducing the risk of FN in early-stage breast cancer patients. A total of 351 women (177 in the pegfilgrastim group and 174 in the placebo group) between 20 and 69 years of age with stage I-III invasive breast carcinoma who were to receive TC chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) as either neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy were enrolled; 346 of these patients were treated with either pegfilgrastim (n = 173) or placebo (n = 173).

RESULTS:

The incidence of FN was significantly lower in the pegfilgrastim group than in the placebo group (1.2 vs. 68.8 %, respectively; P < 0.001). In addition, patients in the pegfilgrastim group required less hospitalization and antibiotics for FN. Most adverse events were consistent with those expected for breast cancer subjects receiving TC chemotherapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pegfilgrastim is safe and significantly reduces the incidence of FN in breast cancer patients.

PMID:
25576433
PMCID:
PMC4381099
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-014-2597-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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