Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Microbes Infect. 2015 Apr;17(4):266-74. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2014.12.016. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

Human-associated fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli clonal lineages, including ST354, isolated from canine feces and extraintestinal infections in Australia.

Author information

1
School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia; Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Woodbridge Road, NSW 2568, Australia.
2
School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA 5371, Australia.
3
Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Woodbridge Road, NSW 2568, Australia.
4
School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia.
5
School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia; Biosecurity Sciences Laboratory, Biosecurity Queensland, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Coopers Plains QLD 4108, Australia.
6
Infectious Diseases (111F), VA Medical Center, 1 Veterans Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA.
7
School of Biology, The Australian National University, Acton, ACT 0200, Australia.
8
University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
9
School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA 5371, Australia. Electronic address: darren.trott@adelaide.edu.au.

Abstract

Phylogenetic group D extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), including O15:K52:H1 and clonal group A, have spread globally and become fluoroquinolone-resistant. Here we investigated the role of canine feces as a reservoir of these (and other) human-associated ExPEC and their potential as canine pathogens. We characterized and compared fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates originally identified as phylogenetic group D from either the feces of hospitalized dogs (n = 67; 14 dogs) or extraintestinal infections (n = 53; 33 dogs). Isolates underwent phylogenetic grouping, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, virulence genotyping, resistance genotyping, human-associated ExPEC O-typing, and multi-locus sequence typing. Five of seven human-associated sequence types (STs) exhibited ExPEC-associated O-types, and appeared in separate RAPD clusters. The largest subgroup (16 fecal, 26 clinical isolates) were ST354 (phylogroup F) isolates. ST420 (phylogroup B2); O1-ST38, O15:K52:H1-ST393, and O15:K1-ST130 (phylogroup D); and O7-ST457, and O1-ST648 (phylogroup F) were also identified. Three ST-specific RAPD sub-clusters (ST354, ST393, and ST457) contained closely related isolates from both fecal or clinical sources. Genes encoding CTX-M and AmpC β-lactamases were identified in isolates from five STs. Major human-associated fluoroquinolone-resistant ± extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant ExPEC of public health importance may be carried in dog feces and cause extraintestinal infections in some dogs.

KEYWORDS:

Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant; Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli; Fluoroquinolone-resistant; Phylogenetic group D

PMID:
25576024
DOI:
10.1016/j.micinf.2014.12.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center