Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2015 Apr;23(4):565-70. doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2014.12.023. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

The relation of MRI-detected structural damage in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint to knee pain: the Multicenter and Framingham Osteoarthritis Studies.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: stefanik@bu.edu.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, MGHIHP, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: grossd@bu.edu.
3
Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: ali.guermazi@bmc.org.
4
Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: dfelson@bu.edu.
5
Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: frank.roemer@klinikum-augsburg.de.
6
Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: yuquing@bu.edu.
7
Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: niujp@bu.edu.
8
Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. Electronic address: neil-segal@uiowa.edu.
9
Department of Medicine, UAB, Birmingham, AB, USA. Electronic address: celewis@uabmc.edu.
10
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: mnevitt@psg.ucsf.edu.
11
Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: tneogi@bu.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relation of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain.

METHODS:

We categorized the location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). We determined the relation of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression.

RESULTS:

In MOST (n = 1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no association with knee pain. BMLs in both the medial and lateral PFJ had 1.5 (1.1, 2.0) times the odds of knee pain compared with knees without BMLs. Knee pain severity was lowest in knees with isolated medial PFJ cartilage loss or BMLs. In FOA (n = 934 knees), neither isolated medial nor lateral cartilage loss was associated with knee pain, whereas isolated BMLs in either region were associated with pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results were not completely concordant but suggest that knee pain risk and severity is greatest with cartilage loss isolated to (MOST) or inclusive of (MOST and FOA) the lateral PFJ. While BMLs in either the medial or lateral PFJ are related to pain.

KEYWORDS:

Magnetic resonance imaging; Osteoarthritis; Pain; Patellofemoral

PMID:
25575967
PMCID:
PMC4368472
DOI:
10.1016/j.joca.2014.12.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center