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Nat Commun. 2015 Jan 9;6:5862. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6862.

CCR7-dependent trafficking of RORγ⁺ ILCs creates a unique microenvironment within mucosal draining lymph nodes.

Author information

1
MRC Centre for Immune Regulation, Institute for Biomedical Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
2
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8TA, UK.
3
Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FL, UK.
4
1] Division of Gastroenterology, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, New York, New York 10021, USA [2] The Jill Robert's Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10021, USA.
5
1] Division of Gastroenterology, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, New York, New York 10021, USA [2] The Jill Robert's Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10021, USA [3] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Jill Robert's Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10021, USA.

Abstract

Presentation of peptide:MHCII by RORγ-expressing group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), which are enriched within gut tissue, is required for control of CD4 T-cell responses to commensal bacteria. It is not known whether ILC populations migrate from their mucosal and peripheral sites to local draining secondary lymphoid tissues. Here we demonstrate that ILC3s reside within the interfollicular areas of mucosal draining lymph nodes, forming a distinct microenvironment not observed in peripheral lymph nodes. By photoconverting intestinal cells in Kaede mice we reveal constitutive trafficking of ILCs from the intestine to the draining mesenteric lymph nodes, which specifically for the LTi-like ILC3s was CCR7-dependent. Thus, ILC populations traffic to draining lymph nodes using different mechanisms.

PMID:
25575242
PMCID:
PMC4354100
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms6862
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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