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Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Jan;109(1):3-4. doi: 10.1093/trstmh/tru185.

Ready to benefit from training: heterologous effects of early life immunization.

Author information

1
Buckingham Browne and Nichols School, Cambridge, 02138, MA, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, 02115, MA, USA Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115, MA, USA ofer.levy@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Trained immunity reflects the ability of the innate immune system to adapt via epigenetic changes in monocytes, enhancing responses to a range of microbes, thereby potentially reducing infection in high-risk populations. Examples of trained immunity at birth include enhanced resistance to infection in TLR-simulated newborn mice, reduced risk of late onset sepsis with histologic chorioamnionitis and beneficial heterologous effects of neonatal bacille Calmette-Guérin administration in reducing diverse infections during infancy. Future efforts will assess leveraging trained immunity in early life by administering 'stand-alone' innate immune stimuli or (self-)adjuvanted vaccines to protect against a broad range of infections.

KEYWORDS:

Heterologous immunity; Infant; Newborn; Non-specific effect; Trained immunity; Vaccine

PMID:
25573103
PMCID:
PMC4351359
DOI:
10.1093/trstmh/tru185
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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