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Trends Microbiol. 2015 Apr;23(4):204-11. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2014.12.007. Epub 2015 Jan 5.

Virological features associated with the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1.

Author information

1
Centre for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa; University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa. Electronic address: pennym@nicd.ac.za.
2
Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa; Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town & National Health Laboratory Services, South Africa.
3
Centre for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa; University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Abstract

The development of a preventative HIV-1 vaccine remains a global public health priority. This will likely require the elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) able to block infection by diverse viral strains from across the world. Understanding the pathway to neutralization breadth in HIV-1 infected humans will provide insights into how bNAb lineages arise, a process that probably involves a combination of host and viral factors. Here, we focus on the role of viral characteristics and evolution in shaping bNAbs during HIV-1 infection, and describe how these findings may be translated into novel vaccine strategies.

KEYWORDS:

HIV-1; broadly neutralizing antibodies; immunotypes; superinfection; vaccine; viral evolution

PMID:
25572881
PMCID:
PMC4380704
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2014.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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