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PLoS Genet. 2015 Jan 8;11(1):e1004920. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004920. eCollection 2015 Jan.

Century-scale methylome stability in a recently diverged Arabidopsis thaliana lineage.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
2
Machine Learning and Computational Biology Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology and Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Tübingen, Germany; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
3
The Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben, Germany.
4
Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany.
5
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
6
Machine Learning and Computational Biology Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology and Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Tübingen, Germany; Center for Bioinformatics (ZBIT), Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

Abstract

There has been much excitement about the possibility that exposure to specific environments can induce an ecological memory in the form of whole-sale, genome-wide epigenetic changes that are maintained over many generations. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, numerous heritable DNA methylation differences have been identified in greenhouse-grown isogenic lines, but it remains unknown how natural, highly variable environments affect the rate and spectrum of such changes. Here we present detailed methylome analyses in a geographically dispersed A. thaliana population that constitutes a collection of near-isogenic lines, diverged for at least a century from a common ancestor. Methylome variation largely reflected genetic distance, and was in many aspects similar to that of lines raised in uniform conditions. Thus, even when plants are grown in varying and diverse natural sites, genome-wide epigenetic variation accumulates mostly in a clock-like manner, and epigenetic divergence thus parallels the pattern of genome-wide DNA sequence divergence.

PMID:
25569172
PMCID:
PMC4287485
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1004920
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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