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Aesthet Surg J. 2015 Jan;35(1):81-8. doi: 10.1093/asj/sju022.

The impact of perioperative hypothermia on plastic surgery outcomes: a multivariate logistic regression of 1062 cases.

Author information

1
From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Perioperative hypothermia has been associated with increased rates of infection, prolonged recovery time, and coagulopathy.

OBJECTIVES:

The authors assessed the impact of hypothermia on patient outcomes after plastic surgery and analyzed the impact of prewarming on postoperative outcomes.

METHODS:

The medical charts of 1062 patients who underwent complex plastic surgery typically lasting at least 1 hour were reviewed. Hypothermia was defined as a temperature at or below 36°C. Postoperative complication data were collected for outcomes including infection, delayed wound healing, seroma, hematoma, dehiscence, deep venous thrombosis, and overall wound problems. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from 3 multivariate logistic regression models of hypothermia and one model of body contouring procedures that included prewarming as a parameter.

RESULTS:

Perioperative hypothermia was not a significant predictor of wound problems (OR = 0.83; P = .28). In the stratified regression model, hypothermia did not significantly impact wound problems. The regression model measuring the interaction between hypothermia and operating time did not show a significantly increased risk of wound problems. Prewarming did not significantly affect perioperative hypothermia (P = .510), and in the model of body contouring procedures with prewarming as a categorical variable, massive weight loss was the most significant predictor of wound complications (OR = 2.57; P = .003). Prewarming did not significantly affect outcomes (OR = 1.49; P = .212).

CONCLUSIONS:

Based on univariate and multivariate models in our study, mild perioperative hypothermia appears to be independent of wound complications. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 4: Risk.

PMID:
25568237
DOI:
10.1093/asj/sju022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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