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J Am Board Fam Med. 2015 Jan-Feb;28(1):11-2. doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2015.01.140217.

Fewer family physicians are in solo practices.

Author information

1
From the American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky (LEP, RLP); the Department of Family Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (EB); the Departments of Family & Community Medicine and Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio (CRJ); and the Research to Advance Community Health (ReACH) Center, San Antonio, TX (CRJ). lpeterson@theabfm.org.
2
From the American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky (LEP, RLP); the Department of Family Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (EB); the Departments of Family & Community Medicine and Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio (CRJ); and the Research to Advance Community Health (ReACH) Center, San Antonio, TX (CRJ).

Abstract

Over the past 20 years there has been a statistically significant trend toward fewer family physicians identifying as being in solo practice. Further study to determine the reasons for this decline and its impact on access to care will be critical because rural areas are more dependent on solo practitioners.

KEYWORDS:

Health Care Systems; Health Policy; Rural Health

PMID:
25567817
DOI:
10.3122/jabfm.2015.01.140217
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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