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Biochim Biophys Acta. 1989 Dec 7;977(3):322-8.

The effect of pH and temperature on the reaction of fully reduced and mixed-valence cytochrome c oxidase with dioxygen.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Gøoteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

The reaction of fully reduced and mixed-valence cytochrome oxidase with O2 has been followed in flow-flash experiments, starting from the CO complexes, at 428, 445, 605 and 830 nm between pH 5.8b and 9.0 in the temperature range of 2-40 degrees C. With the fully reduced enzyme, four kinetic phase with rate constants at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C of 9 x 10(4), 2.5 x 10(4), 1.0 x 10(4) and 800 s(-1), respectively, are observed. The rates of the three last phases display a very small temperature dependence, corresponding to activation energies in the range 13-54 kJ x mol(-1). The rates of the third and fourth phases decrease at high pH due to the deprotonation of groups with pKa values of 8.3 and 8.8, respectively, but also the second phase appears to have a small pH dependence. In the reaction of the mixed-valence enzyme, three kinetic phases with rate constants at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C of 9 x 10(4), 6000 and 150 s(-1), respectively, are observed. The third phase only has a small temperature dependence, corresponding to an activation energy of 20 kJ x mol(-1). No pH dependence could be detected for any phase. Reaction schemes consistent with the experimental observations are presented. The pH dependencies of the rates of the two final phase in the reaction of the fully reduced enzyme are proposed to be related to the involvement of protons in the reduction of a peroxide intermediate. The temperature dependence data suggest that the reorganization energies and driving forces are closely matched in all electron transfer steps with both enzyme forms. It is suggested that the slowest step in the reaction of the mixed-valence enzyme is a conformation change involved in the reaction cycle of cytochrome oxidase as a proton pump.

PMID:
2556181
DOI:
10.1016/s0005-2728(89)80087-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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