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World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Dec 28;20(48):18151-64. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i48.18151.

Colorectal carcinogenesis--update and perspectives.

Author information

1
Hans Raskov, Speciallægecentret ved Diakonissestiftelsen, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common malignancy in the Western World and despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and screening, it is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this part of the world. Numerous factors are found important in the development of CRC including colonocyte metabolism, high risk luminal environment, inflammation, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. In recent years focus has turned towards the genetics and molecular biology of CRC and several interesting and promising correlations and pathways have been discovered. The major genetic pathways of CRC are the Chromosome Instability Pathway representing the pathway of sporadic CRC through the K-ras, APC, and P53 mutations, and the Microsatellite Instability Pathway representing the pathway of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer through mutations in mismatch repair genes. To identify early cancers, screening programs have been initiated, and the leading strategy has been the use of faecal occult blood testing followed by colonoscopy in positive cases. Regarding the treatment of colorectal cancer, significant advances have been made in the recent decade. The molecular targets of CRC include at least two important cell surface receptors: the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The genetic and molecular knowledge of CRC has widen the scientific and clinical perspectives of diagnosing and treatment. However, despite significant advances in the understanding and treatment of CRC, results from targeted therapy are still not convincing. Future studies will determine the role for this new treatment modality.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal carcinogenesis; Diet; Genetics; Inflammation; Microbiology; Microbiome; Risk factors

PMID:
25561783
PMCID:
PMC4277953
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v20.i48.18151
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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