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J Adv Nurs. 2015 May;71(5):1087-97. doi: 10.1111/jan.12604. Epub 2015 Jan 6.

Predictors of initial weight loss among women with abdominal obesity: a path model using self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviour.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health Nursing, College of Nursing, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

AIM:

To identify predictors of initial weight loss among women with abdominal obesity by using a path model.

BACKGROUND:

Successful weight loss in the initial stages of long-term weight management may promote weight loss maintenance.

DESIGN:

A longitudinal study design.

METHODS:

Study participants were 75 women with abdominal obesity, who were enrolled in a 12-month Community-based Heart and Weight Management Trial and followed until a 6-month assessment. The Weight Efficacy Lifestyle, Exercise Self-Efficacy and Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II measured diet self-efficacy, exercise self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviour respectively. All endogenous and exogenous variables used in our path model were change variables from baseline to 6 months. Data were collected between May 2011-May 2012.

FINDINGS:

Based on the path model, increases in both diet and exercise self-efficacy had significant effects on increases in health-promoting behaviour. Increases in diet self-efficacy had a significant indirect effect on initial weight loss via increases in health-promoting behaviour. Increases in health-promoting behaviour had a significant effect on initial weight loss.

CONCLUSION:

Among women with abdominal obesity, increased diet self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviour were predictors of initial weight loss. A mechanism by which increased diet self-efficacy predicts initial weight loss may be partially attributable to health-promoting behavioural change. However, more work is still needed to verify causality. Based on the current findings, intensive nursing strategies for increasing self-efficacy for weight control and health-promoting behaviour may be essential components for better weight loss in the initial stage of a weight management intervention.

KEYWORDS:

abdominal obesity; behavioural research; nursing; obesity; self-efficacy; weight loss

PMID:
25560742
DOI:
10.1111/jan.12604
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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