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Arch Biochem Biophys. 2015 Jun 15;576:39-48. doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2014.12.018. Epub 2015 Jan 3.

Obesity-induced oxidative stress, accelerated functional decline with age and increased mortality in mice.

Author information

1
The Sam and Ann Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.
2
Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
3
The Sam and Ann Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.
4
Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, Oklahoma, OK, USA.
5
The Sam and Ann Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; Department of Molecular Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: salmona@uthscsa.edu.

Abstract

Obesity is a serious chronic disease that increases the risk of numerous co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer as well as increases risk of mortality, leading some to suggest this condition represents accelerated aging. Obesity is associated with significant increases in oxidative stress in vivo and, despite the well-explored relationship between oxidative stress and aging, the role this plays in the increased mortality of obese subjects remains an unanswered question. Here, we addressed this by undertaking a comprehensive, longitudinal study of a group of high fat-fed obese mice and assessed both their changes in oxidative stress and in their performance in physiological assays known to decline with aging. In female C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet starting in adulthood, mortality was significantly increased as was oxidative damage in vivo. High fat-feeding significantly accelerated the decline in performance in several assays, including activity, gait, and rotarod. However, we also found that obesity had little effect on other markers of function and actually improved performance in grip strength, a marker of muscular function. Together, this first comprehensive assessment of longitudinal, functional changes in high fat-fed mice suggests that obesity may induce segmental acceleration of some of the aging process.

KEYWORDS:

Gait; Grip strength; Longevity; Obesity; Oxidation; Respirometry; Rotarod

PMID:
25558793
PMCID:
PMC4456198
DOI:
10.1016/j.abb.2014.12.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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