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J Immunol. 2015 Feb 1;194(3):929-39. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1402168. Epub 2015 Jan 2.

The V gene repertoires of classical and atypical memory B cells in malaria-susceptible West African children.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852; severin.zinocker@gmail.com spierce@nih.gov.
2
Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852;
3
Laboratory for Neonatology and Pediatric Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Philipps-University, D-35032 Marburg, Germany;
4
Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852; Department of Pathology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908;
5
Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510; and.
6
Mali International Center for Excellence in Research, University of Sciences, Technique and Technology of Bamako, Bamako, Mali.

Abstract

Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria is naturally acquired in individuals living in malaria-endemic areas of Africa. Abs play a key role in mediating this immunity; however, the acquisition of the components of Ab immunity, long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells (MBCs), is remarkably inefficient, requiring years of malaria exposure. Although long-lived classical MBCs (CD19(+)/CD20(+)/CD21(+)/CD27(+)/CD10(-)) are gradually acquired in response to natural infection, exposure to P. falciparum also results in a large expansion of what we have termed atypical MBCs (CD19(+)/CD20(+)/CD21(-)/CD27(-)/CD10(-)). At present, the function of atypical MBCs in malaria is not known, nor are the factors that drive their differentiation. To gain insight into the relationship between classical and atypical IgG(+) MBCs, we compared the Ab H and L chain V gene repertoires of children living in a malaria-endemic region in Mali. We found that these repertoires were remarkably similar by a variety of criteria, including V gene usage, rate of somatic hypermutation, and CDR-H3 length and composition. The similarity in these repertoires suggests that classical MBCs and atypical MBCs differentiate in response to similar Ag-dependent selective pressures in malaria-exposed children and that atypical MBCs do not express a unique V gene repertoire.

PMID:
25556245
PMCID:
PMC4297690
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1402168
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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