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Mol Biol Evol. 2015 Apr;32(4):1091-6. doi: 10.1093/molbev/msu399. Epub 2015 Jan 2.

The effect of species representation on the detection of positive selection in primate gene data sets.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
2
Liberty Hill High School, Liberty Hill, TX.
3
Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX saras@mail.utexas.edu.

Abstract

Over evolutionary time, both host- and virus-encoded genes have been continually selected to modify their interactions with one another. This has resulted in the rapid evolution of the specific codons that govern the physical interactions between host and virus proteins. Virologists have discovered that these evolutionary signatures, acquired in nature, can provide a shortcut in the functional dissection of host-virus interactions in the laboratory. However, the use of evolution studies in this way is complicated by the fact that many nonhuman primate species are endangered, and biomaterials are often difficult to acquire. Here, we assess how the species representation in primate gene data sets affects the detection of positive natural selection. Our results demonstrate how targeted primate sequencing projects could greatly enhance research in immunology, virology, and beyond.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; host–virus arms race; host–virus coevolution; positive selection; simian primates

PMID:
25556235
PMCID:
PMC4379402
DOI:
10.1093/molbev/msu399
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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