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Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2015 May;96:17-24. doi: 10.1016/j.plefa.2014.12.005. Epub 2014 Dec 22.

The effects of aspirin on platelet function and lysophosphatidic acids depend on plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, 265 Crittenden Boulevard, Box CU 420644, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. Electronic address: robert_block@urmc.rochester.edu.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, 265 Crittenden Boulevard, Box CU 420644, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
3
Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, 265 Crittenden Boulevard, Box CU 420644, Rochester, NY 14642 USA.
4
Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA.
5
Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
6
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA.
7
Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USA.

Abstract

Aspirin's prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is controversial. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and aspirin all affect the cyclooxygenase enzyme. The relationship between plasma EPA and DHA and aspirin's effects has not been determined. Thirty adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus ingested aspirin (81 mg/day) for 7 days, then EPA+DHA (2.6g/day) for 28 days, then both for another 7 days. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) species and more classic platelet function outcomes were determined. Plasma concentrations of total EPA+DHA were associated with 7-day aspirin reduction effects on these outcomes in a "V"-shaped manner for all 11 LPA species and ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This EPA+DHA concentration was quite consistent for each of the LPA species and ADP. These results support aspirin effects on lysolipid metabolism and platelet aggregation depending on plasma EPA+DHA concentrations in individuals with a disturbed lipid milieu.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01181882.

KEYWORDS:

Aspirin; Docosahexaenoic acid; Eicosapentaenoic acid; Lysophosphatidic acid; Lysophosphatidylcholine; Platelet function

PMID:
25555354
PMCID:
PMC4395522
DOI:
10.1016/j.plefa.2014.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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