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Am J Occup Ther. 2015 Jan-Feb;69(1):6901290020p1-10. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2015.012021.

Lifestyle changes and pressure ulcer prevention in adults with spinal cord injury in the pressure ulcer prevention study lifestyle intervention.

Author information

  • 1Samruddhi Ghaisas, OTD, OTR/L, is Director of Rehabilitation, Alhambra Healthcare and Wellness Center, Alhambra, CA. When this article was written, she was Occupational Therapy Doctorate Resident, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
  • 2Elizabeth A. Pyatak, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
  • 3Erna Blanche, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
  • 4Jeanine Blanchard, PhD, OTR/L, is Project Coordinator, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; jeanine@chan.usc.edu.
  • 5Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Associate Dean and Chair, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

Abstract

Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California-Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern.

PMID:
25553751
PMCID:
PMC4281707
DOI:
10.5014/ajot.2015.012021
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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