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Am J Occup Ther. 2015 Jan-Feb;69(1):6901180030p1-9. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2015.011965.

Effectiveness of interventions to improve occupational performance of people with motor impairments after stroke: an evidence-based review.

Author information

1
Dawn M. Nilsen, EdD, OTL, is Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine (Occupational Therapy), Columbia University, New York, NY; dmn12@columbia.edu.
2
Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine (Occupational Therapy), Columbia University, New York, NY.
3
Daniel Geller, MS, MPH, OTR/L, Kimberly Hreha, OTR/L, Ellen Osei, MS, OTR/L, and Ghazala T. Saleem, MS, OTR/L, are Doctoral Students, Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY.

Abstract

We conducted a review to determine the effectiveness of interventions to improve occupational performance in people with motor impairments after stroke as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Practice Project. One hundred forty-nine studies met inclusion criteria. Findings related to key outcomes from select interventions are presented. Results suggest that a variety of effective interventions are available to improve occupational performance after stroke. Evidence suggests that repetitive task practice, constraint-induced or modified constraint-induced movement therapy, strengthening and exercise, mental practice, virtual reality, mirror therapy, and action observation can improve upper-extremity function, balance and mobility, and/or activity and participation. Commonalities among several of the effective interventions include the use of goal-directed, individualized tasks that promote frequent repetitions of task-related or task-specific movements.

PMID:
25553742
DOI:
10.5014/ajot.2015.011965
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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