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Nitric Oxide. 2015 Apr 30;46:7-13. doi: 10.1016/j.niox.2014.12.004. Epub 2014 Dec 29.

Role of cGMP in hydrogen sulfide signaling.

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
2
School of Kinesiology, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research Unit (CMRU), Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
3
"G. P. Livanos" Laboratory, First Department of Critical Care and Pulmonary Services, Evangelismos Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
4
Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
5
Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras, Greece.
6
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; "G. P. Livanos" Laboratory, First Department of Critical Care and Pulmonary Services, Evangelismos Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: apapappet@pharm.uoa.gr.

Abstract

The importance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in physiology and disease is being increasingly recognized in recent years. Unlike nitric oxide (NO) that signals mainly through soluble guanyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP, H2S is more promiscuous, affecting multiple pathways. It interacts with ion channels, enzymes, transcription factors and receptors. It was originally reported that H2S does not alter the levels of cyclic nucleotides. More recent publications, however, have shown increases in intracellular cGMP following exposure of cells or tissues to exogenously administered or endogenously produced H2S. Herein, we discuss the evidence for the participation of cGMP in H2S signaling and reconcile the seemingly divergent results presented in the literature on the role of this cyclic nucleotide in the biological actions of H2S.

KEYWORDS:

Angiogenesis; Hydrogen sulfide; PKG; Relaxation; cGMP

PMID:
25553675
DOI:
10.1016/j.niox.2014.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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