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PLoS One. 2014 Dec 31;9(12):e114633. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114633. eCollection 2014.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use is associated with reduced risk of inflammation-associated cancers: NIH-AARP study.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Human Health and Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America.
2
AARP (Retired), Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America.
3
Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California, United States of America; Stanford Cancer Institute, Palo Alto, California, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic inflammation has been linked to cancers, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been associated with reduced risk of several cancers. To further refine the magnitude of NSAID-related associations, in particular for cancers related to inflammation, such as alcohol-, infection-, obesity-, and smoking-related cancers, as well as for less common cancers, we evaluated the use of NSAIDs and cancer risk in a very large cohort. We used propensity scores to account for potential selection bias and hypothesized that NSAID use is associated with decreased cancer incidence.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective study among 314,522 participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Individuals who completed the lifestyle questionnaire, which included NSAID use, in 1996-1997 were followed through 2006. Information on cancer incidence was ascertained by linking to cancer registries and vital status databases.

FINDINGS:

During 2,715,994 person-years of follow-up (median 10.1 person-years), there were 51,894 incident cancers. Compared with non-users of NSAIDs, individuals who reported use in the 12 months prior to interview had a significantly lower risk of all inflammation-related cancer, alcohol-related, infection-related, obesity-related, and smoking-related cancers [hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI)) 0.90 (0.87-0.93), 0.80 (0.74-0.85), 0.82 (0.78-0.87), 0.88 (0.84-0.92), and 0.88 (0.85-0.92) respectively)].

CONCLUSIONS:

After accounting for potential selection bias, our data showed an inverse association between NSAID use and alcohol-related, infection-related, obesity-related, and smoking-related cancers and support the hypothesis that inflammation is related to an increased risk of certain cancers.

PMID:
25551641
PMCID:
PMC4281259
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0114633
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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