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Dermatol Surg. 2015 Jan;41 Suppl 1:S67-74. doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000000146.

Effects of OnabotulinumtoxinA treatment for crow's feet lines on patient-reported outcomes.

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1
*DeNova Research, Chicago, Illinois; †Coleman Center for Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery, Metairie, Louisiana; ‡SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts; §Aalst Dermatology Clinic, Aalst, Belgium; ‖Peloton Advantage, Parsippany, New Jersey; ¶Allergen, Inc., Irvine, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although millions of aesthetic procedures are performed annually, few patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures have been used in this setting.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the impact of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for crow's feet lines (CFL) on relevant psychological variables and self-perception of age/appearance in subgroup populations.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Facial Lines Outcomes (FLO-11) Questionnaire, Self-Perception of Age (SPA), and Subject Global Assessment of Change in CFL (SGA-CFL) were PRO measures administered in 2 Phase 3, double-blind placebo-controlled trials for the treatment of CFL alone or CFL/glabellar lines (GL). Patient-reported outcome measures were analyzed by subgroups (age, gender, and baseline CFL severity). Subject satisfaction with appearance was also analyzed.

RESULTS:

Most subgroups receiving onabotulinumtoxinA demonstrated significant improvements in psychological impact (FLO-11 Items 2, 5, and 8) versus placebo at Day 30 (p ≤ .05). OnabotulinumtoxinA-treated subjects consistently rated themselves as looking younger on SPA versus placebo in all subgroups at Day 30 (p ≤ .05) and showed significant improvements in CFL appearance versus placebo at all time points on SGA-CFL. Overall, subjects were satisfied with their appearance.

CONCLUSION:

OnabotulinumtoxinA-treated subjects experienced significant improvements in perceived appearance, attractiveness, tiredness, age, and satisfaction versus placebo. Subjects treated for CFL and GL experienced even greater effects.

PMID:
25548848
DOI:
10.1097/DSS.0000000000000146
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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