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J Lipid Res. 2015 Mar;56(3):713-21. doi: 10.1194/jlr.P055715. Epub 2014 Dec 29.

CETP genotype and changes in lipid levels in response to weight-loss diet intervention in the POUNDS LOST and DIRECT randomized trials.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY Departments of Nutrition Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
2
Cardiology Department Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel Center for Research, Prevention, and Treatment of Atherosclerosis Internal Medicine Department, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
3
Nuclear Research Center, Dimona, Israel.
4
Center for Research, Prevention, and Treatment of Atherosclerosis Internal Medicine Department, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
5
Departments of Nutrition Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
6
Pennington Biomedical Research Center of the Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA.
7
Departments of Nutrition Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
8
Department of Public Health, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
9
Departments of Nutrition Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Abstract

Little is known about whether cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) genetic variation may modify the effect of weight-loss diets varying in fat content on changes in lipid levels. We analyzed the interaction between the CETP variant rs3764261 and dietary interventions on changes in lipid levels among 732 overweight/obese adults from a 2 year randomized weight-loss trial [Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST)], and replicated the findings in 171 overweight/obese adults from an independent 2 year weight-loss trial [Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT)]. In the POUNDS LOST, participants with the CETP rs3764261 CC genotype on the high-fat diet had larger increases in HDL cholesterol (P = 0.001) and decreases in triglycerides (P = 0.007) than those on the low-fat diet at 6 months, while no significant difference between these two diets was observed among participants carrying other genotypes. The gene-diet interactions on changes in HDL-cholesterol and tri-glyc-erides were replicated in the DIRECT (pooled P for interaction ≤ 0.01). Similar results on trajectory of changes in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides over the 2 year intervention were observed in both trials. Our study provides replicable evidence that individuals with the CETP rs3764261 CC genotype might derive greater effects on raising HDL cholesterol and lowering triglycerides by choosing a low-carbohydrate/high-fat weight-loss diet instead of a low-fat diet.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial; Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies; cholesteryl ester transfer protein; gene-diet interaction

PMID:
25548261
PMCID:
PMC4340318
DOI:
10.1194/jlr.P055715
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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