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Laryngoscope. 2015 Jun;125(6):1385-92. doi: 10.1002/lary.25112. Epub 2014 Dec 27.

Voice disorders in Sjögren's syndrome: Prevalence and related risk factors.

Author information

1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.
2
Department of Communication Disorders, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, U.S.A.
3
Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, U.S.A.
4
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.
5
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.
6
Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:

Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease that causes sicca (dryness) symptoms by affecting secretions most notably of the lacrimal and salivary glands. Voice disorders have been documented in patients with SS, but the true prevalence and relationships among possible contributing factors remain unknown. This preliminary epidemiological investigation examined prevalence and risk factors for voice disorders in SS.

STUDY DESIGN:

Self-report epidemiological questionnaire.

METHODS:

One hundred and one (101) patients with SS (94 females, 7 males; M age = 59.4 years; standard deviation [SD] = 14.1 years) completed an extensive interview using a previously validated questionnaire involving the patient's medical, family, occupational, psychosocial, social/lifestyle, voice use, and general health histories. Summary statistics, chi-squares, risk ratios, and multiple logistic regression were used to determine the frequency and severity of voice disorders in individuals with SS, as well as associations with demographic, lifestyle, health, disease severity, and voice use factors.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of a current voice disorder in individuals with SS was 59.4%. In general, voice disorders began gradually; were chronic; and correlated with SS disease severity independent of age, sex, duration of the disease, comorbid autoimmune conditions, and use of SS-related medication. Specific voice symptoms including chronic throat dryness and soreness were significantly associated with SS disease severity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Voice disorders are relatively common in SS and are more frequent as disease severity worsens. These findings have important implications for evaluation and treatment of patients with SS.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

4.

KEYWORDS:

Sjögren's syndrome; epidemiology; prevalence of voice disorders; sicca symptoms

PMID:
25546563
DOI:
10.1002/lary.25112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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