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Head Neck. 2016 Jul;38(7):993-1001. doi: 10.1002/hed.23994. Epub 2015 Aug 6.

Oral squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue: Prospective and objective speech evaluation of patients undergoing surgical therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany.
2
Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital of Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany.
4
Department of Computer Science, Chair of Pattern Recognition, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prospective speech intelligibility assessments lack objectivity in patients undergoing surgery for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of the tongue.

METHODS:

Speech intelligibility was measured based on word recognition by means of an automatic and objective speech recognition system preoperatively, and 14 to 20 days, and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. The study comprised 25 patients with OSCC of the tongue and a healthy control group (n = 40).

RESULTS:

Patients yielded significant speech impairments compared to the healthy control group both before surgery and after 12 months (p ≤ .002). The speech intelligibility of the patients decreased significantly 14 to 20 days after surgery (p < .001) but realigned to preoperative values after 12 months (p = .159). Preservation of the tip of the tongue resulted in significantly higher word recognition after 12 months (p = .007; Δword recognition = 16.29).

CONCLUSION:

Having OSSC of the tongue results in a significant impairment of speech intelligibility. The preservation of the tip of the tongue seems to be a central factor concerning the recovery of speech. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 993-1001, 2016.

KEYWORDS:

oral cancer; speech recognition; speech rehabilitation; surgery; tongue

PMID:
25546291
DOI:
10.1002/hed.23994
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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