Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Infus Nurs. 2015 Jan-Feb;38(1):18-25. doi: 10.1097/NAN.0000000000000082.

An in vitro comparison of microbial ingress into 8 different needleless IV access devices.

Author information

1
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom. Anna Casey, PhD, BSc, is affiliated with the Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust in Birmingham, United Kingdom, and has 13 years of experience in clinical research. She holds a PhD in the prevention and diagnosis of central venous catheter-related infection. Tarja Karpanen, PhD, BSc, RGN, has 15 years of experience as a nurse, mainly in critical care, and more than 8 years' experience in research. She holds a PhD in the improvement of skin antisepsis. Dr. Karpanen works in the Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom. Peter Nightingale, PhD, BSc, is a statistician who has worked in health care for 25 years. He is affiliated with the Wolfson Computer Laboratory, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom. Tom Elliott, PhD, DSc, MRCP, BM, BS, BMedSci, FRCPath, has been a consultant microbiologist for 28 years and has served on many national and international advisory boards and expert groups. His main area of interest is the prevention and management of prosthetic device infections. Dr. Elliott is affiliated with the Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Abstract

There are conflicting reports of the effect needleless intravenous access devices have on rates of catheter-related bloodstream infection. The aim of this study was to identify any differences between the rates of microbial ingress into 8 different devices following contamination. Each type of device was subjected to a 7-day clinical simulation that involved repeated microbial contamination of the injection site and decontamination followed by saline flushes. Significant differences in the number of microorganisms associated with each device were detected in the saline eluates. Three positive-displacement mechanical valves were associated with the ingress of significantly fewer microorganisms compared with other devices.

PMID:
25545971
DOI:
10.1097/NAN.0000000000000082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center