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Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:640291. doi: 10.1155/2014/640291. Epub 2014 Dec 7.

Maternal obesity and occurrence of fetal macrosomia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8M5 ; Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6 ; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6.
2
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6 ; Healthy Active Living and Obesity (HALO) Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1.
3
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine a precise estimate for the contribution of maternal obesity to macrosomia.

DATA SOURCES:

The search strategy included database searches in 2011 of PubMed, Medline (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Ovid Medline, 1950-2011), and EMBASE Classic + EMBASE. Appropriate search terms were used for each database. Reference lists of retrieved articles and review articles were cross-referenced.

METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION:

All studies that examined the relationship between maternal obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) (pregravid or at 1st prenatal visit) and fetal macrosomia (birth weight ≥4000 g, ≥4500 g, or ≥90th percentile) were considered for inclusion.

TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS:

Data regarding the outcomes of interest and study quality were independently extracted by two reviewers. Results from the meta-analysis showed that maternal obesity is associated with fetal overgrowth, defined as birth weight ≥ 4000 g (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.92, 2.45), birth weight ≥4500 g (OR 2.77,95% CI 2.22, 3.45), and birth weight ≥90% ile for gestational age (OR 2.42, 95% CI 2.16, 2.72).

CONCLUSION:

Maternal obesity appears to play a significant role in the development of fetal overgrowth. There is a critical need for effective personal and public health initiatives designed to decrease prepregnancy weight and optimize gestational weight gain.

PMID:
25544943
PMCID:
PMC4273542
DOI:
10.1155/2014/640291
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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