Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Exp Child Psychol. 2015 Mar;131:120-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2014.11.003. Epub 2014 Dec 26.

Process dissociation of familiarity and recollection in children: response deadline affects recollection but not familiarity.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Cognition Institute, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK. Electronic address: laura.koenig@plymouth.ac.uk.
2
School of Psychology, Cognition Institute, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK.

Abstract

According to dual-process theories, recollection (slow and associated with contextual details) and familiarity (fast and automatic) are two independent processes underlying recognition memory. An adapted version of the process dissociation paradigm was used to measure recognition memory in 5-, 7-, and 11-year-olds and adults. In Experiment 1, it was found that 5-year-olds already recollect details of items (i.e., number). Recollection increased particularly between 5 and 7 years. Familiarity differed between 5 years and adulthood. In Experiment 2, under limited response time during retrieval, recollection was eliminated in 5-year-olds and reduced across all ages, whereas familiarity was left unaffected. Together, these findings are consistent with dual-process theories of recognition memory and provide support for two processes underlying recognition memory from a developmental perspective.

KEYWORDS:

Dual-process theory; Familiarity; Process dissociation; Recognition memory; Recollection; Source monitoring

PMID:
25544395
DOI:
10.1016/j.jecp.2014.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center