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Cell Rep. 2015 Jan 6;10(1):75-87. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.12.005. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Input- and cell-type-specific endocannabinoid-dependent LTD in the striatum.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA; Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA; Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. Electronic address: dingjun@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Changes in basal ganglia plasticity at the corticostriatal and thalamostriatal levels are required for motor learning. Endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression (eCB-LTD) is known to be a dominant form of synaptic plasticity expressed at these glutamatergic inputs; however, whether eCB-LTD can be induced at all inputs on all striatal neurons is still debatable. Using region-specific Cre mouse lines combined with optogenetic techniques, we directly investigated and distinguished between corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projections. We found that eCB-LTD was successfully induced at corticostriatal synapses, independent of postsynaptic striatal spiny projection neuron (SPN) subtype. Conversely, eCB-LTD was only nominally present at thalamostriatal synapses. This dichotomy was attributable to the minimal expression of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors on thalamostriatal terminals. Furthermore, coactivation of dopamine receptors on SPNs during LTD induction re-established SPN-subtype-dependent eCB-LTD. Altogether, our findings lay the groundwork for understanding corticostriatal and thalamostriatal synaptic plasticity and for striatal eCB-LTD in motor learning.

PMID:
25543142
PMCID:
PMC4286501
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2014.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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