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Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):157-63. doi: 10.1093/alcalc/agu090. Epub 2014 Dec 27.

Brief intervention in the workplace for heavy drinkers: a randomized clinical trial in Japan.

Author information

1
National Hospital Organization Hizen Psychiatric Center, 160 Mitsu, Yoshinogari, Kanzaki, Saga 842-0192, Japan Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan.
2
National Hospital Organization Hizen Psychiatric Center, 160 Mitsu, Yoshinogari, Kanzaki, Saga 842-0192, Japan takefumi@hizen.hosp.go.jp.
3
Department of Public Health, Health Management and Policy, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-Cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521, Japan.
4
Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan.
5
Department of Mental Health, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-0804, Japan.
6
National Hospital Organization Kurihama Medical and Addiction Center, 5-3-1 Nobi Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-0841, Japan.

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate the effectiveness of brief intervention (BI) conducted in the workplace for heavy drinkers.

METHODS:

A randomized controlled trial was conducted at six companies in Japan. Participants were heavy drinkers who met the inclusion criteria and were randomized into three groups: the BI group, BI with diary group and a control group. Outcomes (total drinks, binge drinking episodes and alcohol-free days) were evaluated at 3 and 12 months.

RESULTS:

The 304 participants recruited were allocated to the three groups and 277 participated in all follow-up evaluations. Dropout rates in the respective groups were 7.0, 14.9 and 5.5%. Some improvements were observed in all the groups. In particular, alcohol-free days in the BI group were significantly increased by 93.0% at 12 months. Total drinks at 12 months were reduced by 41 g per week in the BI group compared with the control group, although the intergroup difference was not significant.

CONCLUSION:

BI in the workplace is effective for increasing the number of alcohol-free days. However, the effectiveness on decreasing alcohol consumption was unclear, which could be explained by alcohol screening itself causing a reduction in drinking.

PMID:
25543127
DOI:
10.1093/alcalc/agu090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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