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Vaccine. 2015 Jan 29;33(5):621-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.12.025. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Anti-group B Streptococcus antibody in infants born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust/Imperial Centre for Global Health Research/Department of Academic Paediatrics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London W2 1NY, UK; Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK. Electronic address: k.mehring-le-doare@imperial.ac.uk.
2
Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG, UK.
3
Wellcome Trust/Imperial Centre for Global Health Research/Department of Academic Paediatrics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London W2 1NY, UK; Medical Research Council, Atlantic Road, Fajara, Gambia.
4
Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK.
5
Desmond Tutu TB Center, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
6
Wellcome Trust/Imperial Centre for Global Health Research/Department of Academic Paediatrics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London W2 1NY, UK; Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK; Desmond Tutu TB Center, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

HIV-exposed uninfected infants have increased infection risk and mortality compared to HIV-unexposed infants. HIV-exposed infants may be at increased risk of invasive GBS disease due to reduced maternal antibody against GBS.

METHODS:

We quantified antibodies that bind to the surface of whole Group B Streptococcus (GBS) of serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V using novel flow cytometry assays in South African HIV-infected and non-infected mothers and their uninfected infants. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b deposition onto GBS of these serotypes was also quantified by a novel flow cytometry assay.

RESULTS:

Geometric mean concentration (GMC) of both surface-binding anti-GBS antibody and antibody-mediated complement deposition onto GBS were reduced in HIV-infected women (n=46) compared to HIV-uninfected women (n=58) for ST1a (surface-binding: 19.3 vs 29.3; p=0.003; complement deposition: 2.9 vs 5.3 SU/mL; p=0.003), STIb (24.9 vs 47.6; p=0.003; 2.6 vs 4.9 SU/mL; p=0.003), STII (19.8 vs 50.0; p=0.001; 3.1 vs 6.2 SU/mL; p=0.001), STIII (27.8 vs 60.1; p=0.001; 2.8 vs 5.3 SU/mL; p=0.001) and STV (121.9 vs 185.6 SU/mL; p<0.001) and in their infants for STIa (complement deposition 9.4 vs 27.0 SU/mL; p=0.02), STIb (13.4 vs 24.5 SU/mL; p=0.02), STII (14.6 vs 42.7 SU/mL; p=0.03), STIII (26.6 vs 62.7 SU/mL; p=0.03) and STV (90.4 vs 165.8 SU/mL; p=0.04). Median transplacental transfer of antibody from HIV-infected women to their infants was reduced compared to HIV-uninfected women for GBS serotypes II (0.42 [IQR 0.22-0.59] vs 1.0 SU/mL [0.42-1.66]; p<0.001), III (0.54 [0.31-1.03] vs 0.95 SU/mL [0.42-3.05], p=0.05) and V (0.51 [0.28-0.79] vs 0.75 SU/mL [0.26-2.9], p=0.04). The differences between infants remained significant at 16 weeks of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal HIV infection was associated with lower anti-GBS surface binding antibody concentration and antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition onto GBS bacteria of serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V. This may render these infants more susceptible to early and late onset GBS disease.

KEYWORDS:

Antibody; Group B Streptococcus; HIV; HIV-exposed-uninfected infants; Immunity

PMID:
25543061
PMCID:
PMC4315133
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.12.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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