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Prev Med. 2015 Feb;71:114-20. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.12.018. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Predictors of support among students, faculty and staff for a smoke-free university campus.

Author information

1
School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. Electronic address: marc.braverman@oregonstate.edu.
2
Office of Healthy Campus Initiatives, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. Electronic address: lisa.hoogesteger@oregonstate.edu.
3
Nellis Family Medicine Clinical Investigation Programs, Nellis Air Force Base, NV 89191, USA. Electronic address: jessica.johnson.68.ctr@us.af.mil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Students, faculty, and staff at a Pacific Northwest public university were surveyed one year after enactment of a smoke-free campus policy. Objectives were to assess levels of support for a smoke-free campus, ascertain exposure levels to outdoor tobacco smoke, and identify correlates of policy support.

METHOD:

A 2013 Web-based survey included 5691 students (response rate 26%) and 2051 faculty/staff (response rate 43%). Measures included support for a smoke-free campus, smoking status, exposure to secondhand smoke, and perceptions of levels of policy support and campus smoking. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors of support.

RESULTS:

Seventy-two percent of students and 77% of faculty/staff supported a smoke-free campus. Respondents reported limited exposure to smoke near building entrances, but exposure near campus boundaries was reported by majorities of students (77%) and faculty/staff (55%). Predictors of students' policy support included never-smoker status, perceived support by peers, perceived student smoking prevalence, campus smoke exposure, and female gender, among others. Predictors of faculty/staff support included never-smoker status, perceived policy support by students and peers, campus smoke exposure, female gender, and age.

CONCLUSION:

Students, faculty, and staff were strongly supportive of the existing smoke-free campus policy. However, the policy led to smoking activity shifting to the campus periphery.

KEYWORDS:

Environmental tobacco smoke; Smoke-free policy; Smoking; Tobacco; Universities

PMID:
25542670
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.12.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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