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J Clin Virol. 2015 Jan;62:25-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2014.11.006. Epub 2014 Nov 15.

Molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in the pediatric emergency department.

Author information

1
Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, 2001 8th Avenue, Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Box 357110, 1959 NE Pacific Street, NW120, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
4
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Box 357110, 1959 NE Pacific Street, NW120, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, 4800 Sandpoint Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.
5
Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, 2001 8th Avenue, Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98121, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, 4800 Sandpoint Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.
6
Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, 2001 8th Avenue, Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98121, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, 4800 Sandpoint Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. Electronic address: janet.englund.@seattlechildrens.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are highly prevalent, genetically diverse, and associated with both mild upper respiratory tract and more severe lower tract illnesses (LRTI).

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize the molecular epidemiology of HRV infections in young children seeking acute medical care.

STUDY DESIGN:

Nasal swabs collected from symptomatic children <3 years of age receiving care in the Emergency and Urgent Care Departments at Seattle Children's Hospital were analyzed by a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system (FilmArray(®)) for multiple viruses including HRV/enterovirus. HRV-positive results were confirmed by laboratory-developed real-time reverse transcription PCR (LD-PCR). Clinical data were collected by chart review. A subset of samples was selected for sequencing using the 5' noncoding region. Associations between LRTI and HRV species and genotypes were estimated using logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Of 595 samples with HRV/enterovirus detected by FilmArray, 474 (80%) were confirmed as HRV by LD-PCR. 211 (96%) of 218 selected samples were sequenced; HRV species A, B, and C were identified in 133 (63%), 6 (3%), and 72 (34%), respectively. LRTI was more common in HRV-C than HRV-A illness episodes (adjusted OR [95% CI] 2.35[1.03-5.35). Specific HRV-A and HRV-C genotypes detected in multiple patients were associated with a greater proportion of LRTI episodes. In 18 patients with >1 HRV-positive illness episodes, a distinct genotype was detected in each.

CONCLUSION:

Diverse HRV genotypes circulated among symptomatic children during the study period. We found an association between HRV-C infections and LRTI in this patient population and evidence of association between specific HRV genotypes and LRTI.

KEYWORDS:

Emergency department; Genotyping; HRV-C; Human rhinovirus; Lower respiratory tract infection

PMID:
25542466
PMCID:
PMC4403738
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2014.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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