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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2015 Mar;149(3):808-20; discussion 820-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2014.10.036. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

Midterm survival after thoracic endovascular aortic repair in more than 10,000 Medicare patients.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, Calif.
2
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, Calif. Electronic address: mddake@stanford.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Aneurysms and dissections of the descending thoracic aorta represent a complex substrate with a variety of therapeutic options. The introduction of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has revolutionized the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. However, longitudinal analyses of post-TEVAR outcomes appropriately stratified by aortic disease remain limited.

METHODS:

A total of 11,996 patients undergoing TEVAR from 2005-2010 were identified from the Medicare/Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services database. Patients were stratified by underlying aortic disease and the presence of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. Survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined predictors of survival from TEVAR.

RESULTS:

After TEVAR, patients had a median survival of 57.6 months (95% confidence interval, 54.9-61.3 months). Although patients without CPT codes had significantly fewer recorded comorbidities, TEVAR survival was comparable between patients with and without CPT codes (56.3 vs 59.5 months, P = .54). The early and late incidence of death varied significantly by aortic disease. Patients with aortic rupture, acute aortic dissection, and aortic trauma had the highest early incidence of death, whereas late survival was highest in patients with acute aortic dissection, aortic trauma, and isolated thoracic aortic aneurysm. Although hospital TEVAR volume was not associated with survival, an independent hospital effect (determined by using a mixed-effect Cox model) associated certain hospitals with a hazard for death 50% of what it was at other hospitals.

CONCLUSIONS:

TEVAR has been applied to a multitude of aortic diseases in the Medicare population; early and late post-TEVAR survival varies by aortic disease. The late incidence of death remains high in TEVAR recipients, although certain aortic diagnoses such as acute aortic dissection, aortic trauma, and isolated thoracic aortic aneurysm were associated with improved late survival. An independent hospital effect, but not hospital volume, is correlated with post-TEVAR survival. Future analyses of TEVAR outcomes using the Medicare database should adjust for underlying aortic diagnoses and the presence of CPT codes.

PMID:
25541408
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2014.10.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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