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Behav Brain Res. 2015 Apr 1;282:70-5. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.12.032. Epub 2014 Dec 22.

TMS evidence for a selective role of the precuneus in source memory retrieval.

Author information

1
Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: s.bonni@hsantalucia.it.
2
Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
3
Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
4
Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Department of System Medicine, "Tor Vergata" University, Rome, Italy.
5
Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Stroke Unit, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

The posteromedial cortex including the precuneus (PC) is thought to be involved in episodic memory retrieval. Here we used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to disentangle the role of the precuneus in the recognition memory process in a sample of healthy subjects. During the encoding phase, subjects were presented with a series of colored pictures. Afterwards, during the retrieval phase, all previously presented items and a sample of new pictures were presented in black, and subjects were asked to indicate whether each item was new or old, and in the latter case to indicate the associated color. cTBS was delivered over PC, posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and vertex before the retrieval phase. The data were analyzed in terms of hits, false alarms, source errors and omissions. cTBS over the precuneus, but not over the PPC or the vertex, induced a selective decrease in source memory errors, indicating an improvement in context retrieval. All the other accuracy measurements were unchanged. These findings suggest a direct implication of the precuneus in successful context-dependent retrieval.

KEYWORDS:

Continuous theta burst stimulation; Precuneus; Retrieval; Source memory

PMID:
25541040
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2014.12.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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