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Clin Neurophysiol. 2015 Sep;126(9):1754-60. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2014.11.023. Epub 2014 Dec 6.

Neurofeedback training of alpha-band coherence enhances motor performance.

Author information

1
Division of Neurorehabilitation, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Division of Neurorehabilitation, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: aguggis@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Neurofeedback training of motor cortex activations with brain-computer interface systems can enhance recovery in stroke patients. Here we propose a new approach which trains resting-state functional connectivity associated with motor performance instead of activations related to movements.

METHODS:

Ten healthy subjects and one stroke patient trained alpha-band coherence between their hand motor area and the rest of the brain using neurofeedback with source functional connectivity analysis and visual feedback.

RESULTS:

Seven out of ten healthy subjects were able to increase alpha-band coherence between the hand motor cortex and the rest of the brain in a single session. The patient with chronic stroke learned to enhance alpha-band coherence of his affected primary motor cortex in 7 neurofeedback sessions applied over one month. Coherence increased specifically in the targeted motor cortex and in alpha frequencies. This increase was associated with clinically meaningful and lasting improvement of motor function after stroke.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results provide proof of concept that neurofeedback training of alpha-band coherence is feasible and behaviorally useful.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The study presents evidence for a role of alpha-band coherence in motor learning and may lead to new strategies for rehabilitation.

KEYWORDS:

Brain–computer interface; Functional connectivity; Resting-state; Stroke

PMID:
25540133
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2014.11.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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