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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2015 Mar 1;118(5):646-54. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00948.2014. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Instantaneous quantification of skeletal muscle activation, power production, and fatigue during cycle ergometry.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation Clinical Trials Center, Division of Respiratory & Critical Care Physiology & Medicine, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Pneumológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; and.
2
Rehabilitation Clinical Trials Center, Division of Respiratory & Critical Care Physiology & Medicine, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California;
3
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Pneumológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; and.
4
Rehabilitation Clinical Trials Center, Division of Respiratory & Critical Care Physiology & Medicine, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom hrossiter@ucla.edu.

Abstract

A rapid switch from hyperbolic to isokinetic cycling allows the velocity-specific decline in maximal power to be measured, i.e., fatigue. We reasoned that, should the baseline relationship between isokinetic power (Piso) and electromyography (EMG) be reproducible, then contributions to fatigue may be isolated from 1) the decline in muscle activation (muscle activation fatigue); and 2) the decline in Piso at a given activation (muscle fatigue). We hypothesized that the EMG-Piso relationship is linear, velocity dependent, and reliable for instantaneous fatigue assessment at intolerance during and following whole body exercise. Healthy participants (n = 13) completed short (5 s) variable-effort isokinetic bouts at 50, 70, and 100 rpm to characterize baseline EMG-Piso. Repeated ramp incremental exercise tests were terminated with maximal isokinetic cycling (5 s) at 70 rpm. Individual baseline EMG-Piso relationships were linear (r(2) = 0.95 ± 0.04) and velocity dependent (analysis of covariance). Piso at intolerance (two legs, 335 ± 88 W) was ∼45% less than baseline [630 ± 156 W, confidence interval of the difference (CIDifference) 211, 380 W, P < 0.05]. Following intolerance, Piso recovered rapidly (F = 44.1; P < 0.05; η(2) = 0.79): power was reduced (P < 0.05) vs. baseline only at 0-min (CIDifference 80, 201 W) and 1-min recovery (CIDifference 13, 80 W). Activation fatigue and muscle fatigue (one leg) were 97 ± 55 and 60 ± 50 W, respectively. Mean bias ± limits of agreement for reproducibility were as follows: baseline Piso 1 ± 30 W; Piso at 0-min recovery 3 ± 35 W; and EMG at Piso 3 ± 14%. EMG power is linear, velocity dependent, and reproducible. Deviation from this relationship at the limit of tolerance can quantify the "activation" and "muscle" related components of fatigue during cycling.

KEYWORDS:

electromyography; exercise testing; isokinetic; muscle fatigue; performance fatigue

PMID:
25539940
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.00948.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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