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J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015 Jan;78(1):147-52. doi: 10.1097/TA.0000000000000487.

An evidence-based review: distracted driver.

Author information

1
From the University of South Florida (L.E.L.), Tampa, Florida; Westchester Medical Center (K.A.), Valhalla, New York; East Carolina University (M.B.), Greenville, North Carolina; Advocate Medical Group (S.S.), Chicago, Illinois; Howard University Hospital (W.G.), Washington, District of Columbia; and Johns Hopkins University (A.D., A.S.), Baltimore Maryland; and Aga Khan University Hospital (J.B.), Karachi, Pakistan Karen Hospital Consulting Clinics (J.M.), Nairobi, Kenya.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cell phone use and texting are prevalent within society and have thus pervaded the driving population. This technology is a growing concern within the confines of distracted driving, as all diversions from attention to the road have been shown to increase the risk of crashes. Adolescent, inexperienced drivers, who have the greatest prevalence of texting while driving, are at a particularly higher risk of crashes because of distraction.

METHODS:

Members of the Injury Control Violence Prevention Committee of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma performed a PubMed search of articles related to distracted driving and cell phone use as a distractor of driving between 2000 and 2013.

RESULTS:

A total of 19 articles were found to merit inclusion as evidence in the evidence-based review. These articles provided evidence regarding the relationship between distracted driving and crashes, cell phone use contributing to automobile accidents, and/or the relationship between driver experience and automobile accidents. (Adjust methods/results sections to the number of articles that correctly corresponds to the number of references, as well as the methodology for reference inclusion.)

CONCLUSION:

Based on the evidence reviewed, we can recommend the following. All drivers should minimize all in-vehicle distractions while on the road. All drivers should not text or use any touch messaging system (including the use of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter) while driving. Younger, inexperienced drivers should especially not use cell phones, texting, or any touch messaging system while driving because they pose an increased risk for death and injury caused by distractions while driving.

PMID:
25539216
DOI:
10.1097/TA.0000000000000487
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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