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Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2015 Apr;13(2):149-56. doi: 10.1007/s40258-014-0142-5.

A systematic review on cost effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions in the United States.

Author information

1
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd. NE, Mailstop E-48, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA, yhuang@cdc.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) focus on funding HIV prevention interventions likely to have high impact on the HIV epidemic. In its most recent funding announcement to state and local health department grantees, CDC required that health departments allocate the majority of funds to four HIV prevention interventions: HIV testing, prevention with HIV-positives and their partners, condom distribution and policy initiatives.

OBJECTIVE:

We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to determine the extent of the cost-effectiveness evidence for each of those interventions.

METHODOLOGY:

We searched for US-based studies published through October 2012. The studies that qualified for inclusion contained original analyses that reported costs per quality-adjusted life-year saved, life-year saved, HIV infection averted, or new HIV diagnosis. For each study, paired reviewers performed a detailed review and data extraction. We reported the number of studies related to each intervention and summarized key cost-effectiveness findings according to intervention type. Costs were converted to 2011 US dollars.

RESULTS:

Of the 50 articles that met the inclusion criteria, 33 related to HIV testing, 15 assessed prevention with HIV-positives and partners, three reported on condom distribution, and one reported on policy initiatives. Methodologies and cost-effectiveness metrics varied across studies and interventions, making them difficult to compare.

CONCLUSION:

Our review provides an updated summary of the published evidence of cost effectiveness of four key HIV prevention interventions recommended by CDC. With the exception of testing-related interventions, including partner services, where economic evaluations suggest that testing often can be cost effective, more cost-effectiveness research is needed to help guide the most efficient use of HIV prevention funds.

PMID:
25536927
DOI:
10.1007/s40258-014-0142-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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