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Neuroimage. 2015 Mar;108:17-22. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.047. Epub 2014 Dec 20.

A voxel-based analysis of brain activity in high-order trigeminal pathway in the rat induced by cortical spreading depression.

Author information

1
Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan. Electronic address: cuiyl@riken.jp.
2
Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan.

Abstract

Cortical spreading depression (SD) is a self-propagating wave of depolarization that is thought to be an underling mechanism of migraine aura. Growing evidence demonstrates that cortical SD triggers neurogenic meningeal inflammation and contributes to migraine headaches via subsequent activation of trigeminal afferents. Although direct and indirect evidence shows that cortical SD activates the trigeminal ganglion (peripheral pathway) and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC, the first central site of the trigeminal nociceptive pathway), it is not yet known whether cortical SD activates the high-order trigeminal nociceptive pathway in the brain. To address this, we induced unilateral cortical SD in rats, and then examined brain activity using voxel-based statistical parametric mapping analysis of FDG-PET imaging. The results show that approximately 40h after the induction of unilateral cortical SD, regional brain activity significantly increased in several regions, including ipsilateral TNC, contralateral ventral posteromedial (VPM) and posterior thalamic nuclei (Po), the trigeminal barrel-field region of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1BF), and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2). These results suggest that cortical SD is a noxious stimulus that can activate the high-order trigeminal nociceptive pathway even after cortical SD has subsided, probably due to prolonged meningeal inflammation.

KEYWORDS:

Brain activity; FDG-PET; Migraine; SPM; Trigeminal nociceptive pathway

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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