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Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2015 Apr;11(4):206-12. doi: 10.1038/nrrheum.2014.200. Epub 2014 Dec 23.

Origin and function of cartilage stem/progenitor cells in osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 450 Technology Drive, Room 221, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA.

Abstract

Articular cartilage is a physiologically non-self-renewing avascular tissue with a singular cell type, the chondrocyte, which functions as the load-bearing surface of the arthrodial joint. Injury to cartilage often progresses spatiotemporally from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to development of degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA). Although lacking intrinsic reparative ability, articular cartilage has been shown to contain a population of stem cells or progenitor cells, similar to those found in many other adult tissues, that are thought to be involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. These so-called cartilage-derived stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs) have been observed in human, equine and bovine articular cartilage, and have been identified, isolated and characterized on the basis of expression of stem-cell-related surface markers, clonogenicity and multilineage differentiation ability. However, the origin and functions of CSPCs are incompletely understood. We review here the current status of CSPC research and discuss the possible origin of these cells, what role they might have in cartilage repair, and their therapeutic potential in OA.

PMID:
25536487
PMCID:
PMC5413931
DOI:
10.1038/nrrheum.2014.200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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