Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Mol Sci. 2014 Dec 19;15(12):23792-835. doi: 10.3390/ijms151223792.

The role of reactive oxygen species in microvascular remodeling.

Author information

1
Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, and Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. mstaiculescu@seas.wustl.edu.
2
Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, and Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. footec@missouri.edu.
3
Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, and Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. meiningerg@missouri.edu.
4
Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, and Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. martinezlemusl@missouri.edu.

Abstract

The microcirculation is a portion of the vascular circulatory system that consists of resistance arteries, arterioles, capillaries and venules. It is the place where gases and nutrients are exchanged between blood and tissues. In addition the microcirculation is the major contributor to blood flow resistance and consequently to regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, structural remodeling of this section of the vascular tree has profound implications on cardiovascular pathophysiology. This review is focused on the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play on changing the structural characteristics of vessels within the microcirculation. Particular attention is given to the resistance arteries and the functional pathways that are affected by ROS in these vessels and subsequently induce vascular remodeling. The primary sources of ROS in the microcirculation are identified and the effects of ROS on other microcirculatory remodeling phenomena such as rarefaction and collateralization are briefly reviewed.

PMID:
25535075
PMCID:
PMC4284792
DOI:
10.3390/ijms151223792
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center