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J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2015 Feb;26(2):240-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2014.10.048. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

Central venous stenosis is more often symptomatic in hemodialysis patients with grafts compared with fistulas.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Electronic address: streroto@uphs.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
3
School of Nursing, Office of Nursing Research, Perelman School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine whether hemodialysis patients with central venous stenosis (CVS) are more frequently symptomatic if they have grafts versus fistulas.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A retrospective review was performed of 500 consecutive discrete patients, half with fistulas and half with grafts, who had fistulograms performed over a 4-year period. All fistulograms were evaluated for CVS, which was graded into quartiles. The presence of collaterals was noted and graded. Patient records were analyzed for symptoms of CVS, including face, neck, breast, or limb swelling. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the association between access type, degree of stenosis, location of stenosis, and symptoms.

RESULTS:

Of 500 fistulograms, 31 were excluded because of inadequate or absent central imaging. Of the remaining 469 patients, 235 had fistulas and 234 had grafts. CVS was present in 51% of patients with fistulas (119 of 237) and 51% of patients with grafts (118 of 237). When CVS was present, 29% (35 of 119) of patients with fistulas were symptomatic versus 52% (62 of 118) of patients with grafts (P = .0005). Overall, only 15% of patients with fistulas in the entire cohort were symptomatic compared with 27% of patients with grafts (P = .002). Sex, access side, and transposition did not influence symptoms; however, patients with upper arm access were more likely than patients with forearm access to be symptomatic (P < .0001), independent of access type.

CONCLUSIONS:

CVS is more likely to be symptomatic in patients with grafts versus fistulas, and patients with upper arm access are more likely than patients with forearm access to be symptomatic.

PMID:
25534637
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvir.2014.10.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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