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Photochem Photobiol. 2015 Mar-Apr;91(2):254-64. doi: 10.1111/php.12406. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Molecular regulation of UV-induced DNA repair.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight is a major etiologic factor for skin cancer, the most prevalent cancer in the United States, as well as premature skin aging. In particular, UVB radiation causes formation of specific DNA damage photoproducts between pyrimidine bases. These DNA damage photoproducts are repaired by a process called nucleotide excision repair, also known as UV-induced DNA repair. When left unrepaired, UVB-induced DNA damage leads to accumulation of mutations, predisposing people to carcinogenesis as well as to premature aging. Genetic loss of nucleotide excision repair leads to severe disorders, namely, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), trichothiodystrophy (TTD) and Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are associated with predisposition to skin carcinogenesis at a young age as well as developmental and neurological conditions. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair is an attractive avenue to preventing or reversing these detrimental consequences of impaired nucleotide excision repair. Here, we review recent studies on molecular mechanisms regulating nucleotide excision repair by extracellular cues and intracellular signaling pathways, with a special focus on the molecular regulation of individual repair factors.

PMID:
25534312
PMCID:
PMC4355264
DOI:
10.1111/php.12406
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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