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Nature. 2015 Jan 29;517(7536):571-5. doi: 10.1038/nature14099. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis.

Author information

1
1] Department of Plant Biology, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA [2] Genome Center, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA.
2
Biology Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA.
3
Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
4
Department of Plant Biology, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA.
5
Department of Plant Sciences, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA.
6
1] Genome Center, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA [2] Department of Computer Science, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA.
7
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA.
8
1] Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA [2] US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.
9
Section of Cell and Developmental Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.
10
Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK.

Abstract

The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

PMID:
25533953
PMCID:
PMC4333722
DOI:
10.1038/nature14099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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