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Nutrients. 2014 Dec 22;6(12):6005-19. doi: 10.3390/nu6126005.

Dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome in the adult population: dose-response meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 10, 63-ro, Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul 150-713, Korea. kolpos@daum.net.
2
Department of Family Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 22 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, Korea. fmchs@dreamwiz.com.
3
Department of Family Medicine, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 10, 63-ro, Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul 150-713, Korea. soulfree@catholic.ac.kr.
4
Department of Family Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 22 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, Korea. musofm@unitel.co.kr.
5
Department of Family Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, 516, Gojan 1-Dong, Danwon-Gu, Ansan-Si Gyeonggi-Do 425-707, Korea. kmcfm@hanmail.net.

Abstract

ncreasing evidence has suggested an association between dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome. However, previous research examining dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome has produced mixed results. Our objective was to determine the relationship between dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome in the adult population using a dose-response meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases from August, 1965, to May, 2014. Observational studies reporting risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for metabolic syndrome in ≥ 3 categories of dietary magnesium intake levels were selected. The data extraction was performed independently by two authors, and the quality of the studies was evaluated using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies (RoBANS). Based on eight cross-sectional studies and two prospective cohort studies, the pooled relative risks of metabolic syndrome per 150 mg/day increment in magnesium intake was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84-0.93; I(2) = 36.3%). The meta-regression model showed a generally linear, inverse relationship between magnesium intake (mg/day) and metabolic syndrome. This dose-response meta-analysis indicates that dietary magnesium intake is significantly and inversely associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, randomized clinical trials will be necessary to address the issue of causality and to determine whether magnesium supplementation is effective for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
25533010
PMCID:
PMC4277012
DOI:
10.3390/nu6126005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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