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Neurosci Lett. 2015 Feb 5;587:87-92. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2014.12.029. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

Classification of prefrontal and motor cortex signals for three-class fNIRS-BCI.

Author information

1
School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, South Korea; Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, South Korea. Electronic address: kshong@pusan.ac.kr.
2
Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, South Korea. Electronic address: noman@pusan.ac.kr.
3
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, South Korea.

Abstract

Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an optical imaging method that can be used for a brain-computer interface (BCI). In the present study, we concurrently measure and discriminate fNIRS signals evoked by three different mental activities, that is, mental arithmetic (MA), right-hand motor imagery (RI), and left-hand motor imagery (LI). Ten healthy subjects were asked to perform the MA, RI, and LI during a 10s task period. Using a continuous-wave NIRS system, signals were acquired concurrently from the prefrontal and the primary motor cortices. Multiclass linear discriminant analysis was utilized to classify MA vs. RI vs. LI with an average classification accuracy of 75.6% across the ten subjects, for a 2-7s time window during the a 10s task period. These results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a three-class fNIRS-BCI using three different intentionally-generated cognitive tasks as inputs.

KEYWORDS:

Brain-computer interface; Functional near-infrared spectroscopy; Linear discriminant analysis; Motor imagery

PMID:
25529197
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2014.12.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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