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Am J Prev Med. 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S78-85. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.09.008.

Wreaking "havoc" on smoking: social branding to reach young adult "partiers" in Oklahoma.

Author information

1
Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education.
2
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies.
3
Rescue Social Change Group, San Diego, California.
4
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco.
5
Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education; Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco. Electronic address: pling@medicine.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

More than 25% of young adult Oklahomans smoked cigarettes in 2012. Tobacco marketing campaigns target young adults in social environments like bars/nightclubs. Social Branding interventions are designed to compete directly with this marketing.

PURPOSE:

To evaluate an intervention to reduce smoking among young adult "Partiers" in Oklahoma. The Partier peer crowd was described as follows: attendance at large nightclubs, fashion consciousness, valuing physical attractiveness, and achieving social status by exuding an image of confidence and financial success.

DESIGN:

Repeated cross-sectional study with three time points.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

Randomized time location survey samples of young adult Partier bar and club patrons in Oklahoma City (Time 1 [2010], n=1,383; Time 2 [2011], n=1,292; and Time 3 [2012], n=1,198). Data were analyzed in 2013.

INTERVENTION:

The "HAVOC" Social Branding intervention was designed to associate a smoke-free lifestyle with Partiers' values, and included events at popular clubs, brand ambassador peer leaders who transmit the anti-tobacco message, social media, and tailored anti-tobacco messaging.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Daily and nondaily smoking rates, and binge drinking rates (secondary).

RESULTS:

Overall, smoking rates did not change (44.1% at Time 1, 45.0% at Time 2, and 47.4% at Time 3; p=0.17), but there was a significant interaction between intervention duration and brand recall. Partiers reporting intervention recall had lower odds of daily smoking (OR=0.30 [0.10, 0.95]) and no difference in nondaily smoking, whereas Partiers who did not recall the intervention had increased odds of smoking (daily AOR=1.74 [1.04, 2.89]; nondaily AOR=1.97 [1.35, 2.87]). Among non-Partiers, those who recalled HAVOC reported no difference in smoking, and those who did not recall HAVOC reported significantly increased odds of smoking (daily AOR=1.53 [1.02, 2.31]; nondaily AOR=1.72 [1.26, 2.36]). Binge drinking rates were significantly lower (AOR=0.73 [0.59, 0.89]) overall.

CONCLUSIONS:

HAVOC has the potential to affect smoking behavior among Oklahoma Partiers without increasing binge drinking.

PMID:
25528713
PMCID:
PMC4292932
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2014.09.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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